Skip to content

Denmark increases its aid to Syrian refugees

Denmark increases the emergency aid to the many refugees in and around Syria by DKK 100 million.

Syrian refugees on their way to safety after having crossed the border into Turkey. One in two inhabitants in Syria are in acute need.

Syrian refugees on their way to safety after having crossed the border into Turkey. One in two inhabitants in Syria are in acute need.

Photo: Ozan Kose/AFP

In light of the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian situation, Denmark will increase its emergency aid to the many refugees in and around Syria. The Government will therefore request that the Finance Committee urgently treat a request for an extraordinary humanitarian contribution of DKK 100 million at the Finance Committee meeting on Wednesday 4 September.

Minister for Development Cooperation Christian Friis Bach states: “In recent weeks, I have been in regular dialogue with the UN system and the key humanitarian actors. We fear that a further deterioration of the humanitarian situation will contribute to destabilising the entire region. There is broad consensus that we are dealing with an exceptional crisis, and that there is a need for a strengthened humanitarian effort.”

“The crisis and refugee flows put enormous pressure on the neighbouring countries, and I am now seriously concerned that it could destabilise the whole of the Middle East. Iraq has received 50,000 refugees in the last two weeks, while in Lebanon refugees now make up almost a fifth of the population. And in Syria itself, millions have been driven from their homes and many have become stranded behind front lines, without access to protection, food, water and basic health services. It is a desperate situation.

“The refugees quite simply need to be able to have some sense of normality in their daily lives – where they can feel safe and secure. This is what we are helping to facilitate through supporting some of the key humanitarian organisations in the region. The World Food Programme delivers food to millions, but it will soon run short of funds for the efforts. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees runs camps and leads the entire response for the two million refugees across the region. And the International Red Cross has an absolutely key role to play in helping the newly arrived refugees in Iraq.”

“There is an urgent need to get the aid out to the many people suffering in Syria itself. Therefore, together with the rest of the international community, we are putting pressure on the warring parties to ensure unhindered access to all those in need.”

Background

Due to the intensified hostilities in Syria and the chemical gas attack in Damascus, the humanitarian situation in Syria is steadily deteriorating. At the same time, the insecurity created as a result of the military escalation and rising shortage of food in Syria has meant that Syria’s neighbours are confronted with a refugee crisis of ever-growing proportions. Against this background, the risk of further destabilisation in the Middle East is increasing. This danger is reinforced by the fact that both Lebanon and Iraq are already extremely vulnerable due to internal unrest.

In the last two weeks alone, over 48,000 Syrians have crossed the border into Iraq in the wake of intensified hostilities and a deterioration of the food situation in northeastern Syria. In Jordan, over half a million Syrians have applied for refugee status with UNHCR. Over 700,000 Syrians have sought refuge in Lebanon, as a result of which at least one in seven people in Lebanon is now a Syrian refugee. In Turkey, there are 459,000 registered refugees and the border has more or less been closed for further influx, whilst there are 110,000 Syrian refugees in Egypt. This put enormous pressure on the neighbouring countries, leading to tensions between the local population and refugees due to the competition for food, water, jobs and public services such as health and education.

The funds will be allocated to three of the most important humanitarian organisations: The World Food Programme (WFP), the UN High Commission on Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Red Cross (ICRC), as general contributions to their efforts in Syria and the region. The funds will be used to cover food aid, clean water and sanitation, health treatment, blankets, tents and registration of the many newly arrived refugees in the camps.

  • ""

    Danida Transparency

  • ""

    International conference on global inequality

  • ""

    Denmark combats violence against women and girls

  • ""

    Danish companies support responsible textile production in Bangladesh

  • ""

    Inauguration of the UN city in Copenhagen

  • ""

    Increased tax revenues to developing countries

  • ""

    The Crown Princess in Zaatari

  • ""

    Denmark contributes to green growth in Africa

  • ""

    Denmark’s participation in EU development cooperation

  • ""

    Development cooperation (also) benefits us

  • ""

    Increased synergy between development cooperation and trade promotion

  • ""

    Opportunity Africa

  • ""

    New initiative: Business Project Development

  • ""

    Emergency relief to the Central African Republic